What Do I Need to Travel to Spain?

Spain has always been one of the top countries we love to visit in Europe. In 2019, over 18 million of us flocked to Spain to soak up the culture, sun and attractions.

You may be asking yourself “what do I need to travel to Spain?”

Don’t worry, we’re here to help

What paperwork do I need to travel to Spain?

First things first, let’s get the paperwork out of the way.

All travellers heading to Spain, including children under 12 years old, must complete and sign the Health Control Form. This is just one of the documents needed for travelling to Spain. The Health Control Form can be completed digitally.

You can also complete the form on paper and submit it before boarding the plane. It comes in Individual and Family/Group formats, so you don’t have to do separate forms for everyone in your party.

Upon completion of the Health Control Form you’ll be given a QR code. This will be digital or a hard copy. This must be shown to Spanish authorities upon arrival.

What else you need to provide varies depending on your reason for travel. If you’re heading out for some sightseeing, you must show proof that you are fully vaccinated against Covid-19. This needs to be dated at least 14 days before you arrive in Spain.

The dates of vaccination need to be included on the proof you take with you. The vaccine must be authorised by either the World Health Organisation or the European Medicines Agency.

Remember that the NHS appointment card is not designed to be used as evidence of the vaccination. So you can’t use this as your proof of vaccination.
Instead, use the NHS Covid Pass, available either through the NHS App or NHS.UK. You can also request a physical copy in the post.

Children under the age of 12 do not need to provide proof of vaccination.

It’s well worth remembering that the Spanish government updates the list of ‘risk countries’ every 7 days. If you have been to one of those countries in the 14 days prior to arriving in Spain, you’ll need to fulfil certain requirements.
These can be found on the Spanish Ministry of Health Travel and COVID-19 page.

This is worth checking. The requirements vary depending on which country you’ve been to. You could be fined up to €3,000 if you do not meet the requirements. You may also be expected to undergo a temperate check and a visual health assessment.

Read through our Coronavirus travel insurance page to find out what cover is available on our policies.

As with travel to any destination, it’s important to check your passport and travel documents before you travel. Ensure your passport is valid for at least 3 months after the day you are planning on leaving Spain.

Your passport must be less than 10 years old. Don’t forget that the 3 months date would need to be within 10 years of the issue date of the passport.

The travel advice, and entry requirements for Spain, can change very quickly. Visit the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office for the very latest updates.

Do I need a Visa to travel to Spain?

What about Visas, I hear you ask. Well, as of 1st January 2021, the rules for visiting Europe changed.
As Spain is in the Schengen area, you can visit for sightseeing, visiting family and friends, for business and short term study.
As long as your trip is no longer than 90 days in total you don’t need a visa.

Please note that if you have travelled to any other Schengen countries within the prior 180 days, these days will count towards the 90 day total.

If you cannot get back to the UK within the 90 days due to Covid-19 you can call 060 from a Spanish phone line to speak with the local immigration office for advice.

If you want to visit Spain for longer than 90 days, you will need to meet the Spanish government’s entry requirements.
The best place to check is the Spanish Consulate in the UK, who should be contacted prior to travel to advise you on which type of visa or work permit you’ll need for your specific trip.

 

Do I need Travel Insurance to travel to Spain?

While the Spanish government does not require that you have travel insurance to enter the country, it is worth bearing in mind the costs of medical treatment in Spain are some of the highest in Europe.

Spain has a large network of high-quality hospitals and medical centres.
The average cost of a trip to A&E is around £184. A trip to the doctor can set you back around £92 on average.

UK travellers to Spain should carry their EHIC or GHIC card when in the country. This can cover the costs of some emergency medical treatment, but won’t cover you for other costs such as repatriation.

And of course, travel insurance covers a range of other events, such as lost baggage or having to cancel your trip.

I think you’ll agree it’s worth taking a look at Spain Travel Insurance, so you don’t need to worry about those costs if the worst should happen on your trip.